Radon Testing and Inspection Services Are Required in Many Home Sales

A home owner’s work is never done. Even when it comes time to sell a house.

You were under the impression that you had done everything within your power to keep your house well maintained and functioning. In the final days of the selling process, however, you find out that there is a silent, sightless, odorless, and tasteless problem that you never even knew existed. The closing process required you to have residential radon testing done, and your house failed. Evidently, a radon testing company was involved in the closing process when you bought your home, but the house passed at that time so you did not even realize that it could be an issue.

Now that your current home has failed the test and you cannot close on the sell until the problem has been addressed, you are busy taking to radon mitigation companies, as well as learning what is involved with a local sump pump installation company. Installed in the lowest part of a basement or crawl space, A sump pump’s job is to help keep the area under the building dry and to prevent it from flooding. Typically, sump pumps are installed in specially constructed sump pits. In addition to helping prevent flooding, a sump pump also provides a way to lessen, and in some cases, even eliminate radon.

Local Sump Pump Installations Are Common in Many Parts of the Country
In a preventative effort, many home owners in various regions across the country install sump pumps in their homes. In addition to serving as a way to keep water out of a basement, a properly installed and covered sump pump can also limit the amount of radon in a basement. In many cases, radon levels are only checked when it comes time for a home to be sold. The reality, however, is that radon is an existing problem in nearly 1 in 15 U.S. homes, where have radon levels at or above the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) action level.

Far more important than the sale of your home, the most critical reason to test for radon in your existing home is to know if your family is being exposed to dangerous levels. Scientists estimate, for example, that lung cancer deaths could be reduced by 2% to 4%, which amounts to 5,000 deaths, by lowering radon levels in homes exceeding the EPA’s action level.